Edmund Stump


Edmund Stump

I am a Professor in the School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University, where I have taught geology since 1976. Over the past 40 years, I have been Principal Investigator on a series of geological research projects funded by the Office of Polar Programs, National Science Foundation, covering more than 1,200 miles of the Transantarctic Mountains. I have twice served as Chief Scientist for large, remote, helicopter-supported camps (1981-82, northern Victoria Land; 2010-11, central Transantarctic Mountains.) Other research includes NSF-funded studies in southern Arizona, the Alaska Range, and the Himalaya. I have written more than 70 scientific articles, and authored three books including Geology of Arizona, with Dale Nations (2nd ed., Kendall-Hunt, 1996), and The Ross Orogen of the Transantarctic Mountains, a scientific monograph on the rocks which are my specialty (Cambridge University Press, 1995.). I have always had a yen to travel, to see new places, and to experience them. I continue to find Nature miraculous on all levels. My choosing geology as a career was in part due to my perception that travel could be part of the job. For me to have had the opportunity to pursue an academic career and to have done research in the Transantarctic Mountains has been far beyond any of my early dreams. The intention of The Roof at the Bottom of the World is to let the secret out. There is this wondrous mountain range out there pushing deep into the interior of Antarctica, wilderness at the polar extreme. Behold!